Home

News

Pig welfare, feral pigs and ASF in Pig Progress 6

In the 6th edition of Pig Progress we visit a farm in the Netherlands where prioritising pig welfare proves to be profitable. We take a closer look at the ASF outbreak in Belgium and Poland and discuss the growing number of feral pigs (wild boar) in the US and Canada, where control of the population is a challenge.

Controlling feral pigs in the US and Canada

There is an enormous, growing population of feral pigs in the US and Canada, and while African Swine Fever has not yet been detected in North or South America, just one case could spread very quickly. Control of the population in both countries has proven fruitless so far. Page 6

These massive feral pigs (or wild boar) often live in groups and their individual weights can exceed 270kg (about 600 pounds). Photo: Dr Ryan K. Brook
These massive feral pigs (or wild boar) often live in groups and their individual weights can exceed 270kg (about 600 pounds). Photo: Dr Ryan K. Brook

African Swine Fever in Belgium – a look back

Belgium hopes that by autumn 2020, the country can declare a “free from ASF” status. African Swine Fever took Belgium by surprise in September 2018 when it was detected in wild boar. Page 8

Many kilometres of fencing were installed in Belgium in an effort to contain the ASF outbreak in the country. Photo: Twan Wiermans
Many kilometres of fencing were installed in Belgium in an effort to contain the ASF outbreak in the country. Photo: Twan Wiermans

ASF, a growing problem for Poland

The number of cases of African Swine Fever continues to rise in Poland, a country struggling to get to grips with the virus. The current situation poses a serious threat for the rest of northwestern Europe. Page 12

Between November 2019 and July 2020, the number of places where infected wild boar had been found had risen to 961, with 1,826 victims. Photo: Iwana Markowska Daniel
Between November 2019 and July 2020, the number of places where infected wild boar had been found had risen to 961, with 1,826 victims. Photo: Iwana Markowska Daniel

Lean solution to fatten profits on pig farms

The EU PiG Innovation Group aims to discover and share best practices and innovations in swine production in Europe. In this episode we look at the 5S Lean Programme, a simple innovation that can have a significant impact. Page 15

Some of the best innovations are the simplest, and this is one of them. Photo: O’Keeffe Piggeries
Some of the best innovations are the simplest, and this is one of them. Photo: O’Keeffe Piggeries

The journey to make money from pig welfare

Owner of Ten Have farm in the Netherlands, Annechien ten Have-Mellema, has embarked on a journey to disprove the theory that consumers will always choose cheap pork over premium pork. Page 18

Pigs at the Ten Have farm are kept on straw when they are indoors. They are free to wander outside, too. Photo: Koos Groenewold
Pigs at the Ten Have farm are kept on straw when they are indoors. They are free to wander outside, too. Photo: Koos Groenewold

Oyster mushroom: A diarrhoea remedy for piglets

Researchers at a university in China have found supplementing piglet diets with oyster mushrooms resulted in a better immune response and a healthy gut, contributing to a reduction in the incidence of diarrhoea. Page 22

Mushrooms have high fibre content and these dietary fibres may decrease intestinal transit time, thus promoting better nutrient digestibility. Photo: Michel Zoeter
Mushrooms have high fibre content and these dietary fibres may decrease intestinal transit time, thus promoting better nutrient digestibility. Photo: Michel Zoeter

Mitigating viruses in pig feed

In 2014, it became known that viruses were being transmitted in feed. In this article we look at what has been discovered and awareness to action. Page 24

The world’s feed industry has become very aware of how viruses can survive in and be transported in feed ingredients. Photo: Ruben Keestra
The world’s feed industry has become very aware of how viruses can survive in and be transported in feed ingredients. Photo: Ruben Keestra

Four good reasons to rethink genetic selection

Genetic selection has caused an ever-growing increase in the number of pigs born alive. Other important factors in pig production have, however, been overlooked, including pre-weaning mortality, and Hernias and other genetic defects. Is it time for a fundamental rethink? Page 26

A hernia umbilicalis in a piglet – a common genetic defect. Photo: Robin Britstra
A hernia umbilicalis in a piglet – a common genetic defect. Photo: Robin Britstra

Your input on castration

A 2016 survey revealed that more than 80% of male pigs are castrated, and only 5% of this castrated population received anaesthesia and analgesia. We would like your input. Page 30

To read the full articles, simply click on the digital magazine section and then on Pig Progress 2020-6. Registration is free.

[View Pig Progress digital magazine] button