Home

Photo & video 2400 views last update:Oct 6, 2011

APVS Congress 2011: Thailand

For the pig business, this week is a busy one, with the VIV Asia in Bangkok later this week preceded by the Asian Pig Veterinary Society Congress, held in Pattaya, Thailand. Vincent ter Beek, Pig Progress editor, got the latest update on Foot-and-Mouth Disease, highly pathogenic PRRS and more at the congress' first day.

Photo

  • The fifth edition of the Asian Pig Veterinary Society (APVS) Congress is held in one of the world's largest resort complexes, located in Pattaya, Thailand. For three days, pig veterinarians from mainly China, Japan, Thailand, Philippines, Vietnam and South Korea gather to discuss the latest research and developments in the pig industry.

    The fifth edition of the Asian Pig Veterinary Society (APVS) Congress is held in one of the world's largest resort complexes, located in Pattaya, Thailand. For three days, pig veterinarians from mainly China, Japan, Thailand, Philippines, Vietnam and South Korea gather to discuss the latest research and developments in the pig industry.

  • About 850 participants from 23 countries are present at this year's edition. In total, 73 oral papers are presented and 149 poster presentations.

    About 850 participants from 23 countries are present at this year's edition. In total, 73 oral papers are presented and 149 poster presentations.

  • Thailand's minister of agriculture and cooperatives, Mr Teera Wongsamuth (right) officially opened the conference. Pictured left is the congress' chairman, Prof Dr Annop Kunanvongkrit.

    Thailand's minister of agriculture and cooperatives, Mr Teera Wongsamuth (right) officially opened the conference. Pictured left is the congress' chairman, Prof Dr Annop Kunanvongkrit.

  • The six member states all presented a clear and updated report about the pig health status in their country. Some had a positive story to tell, like Dr Hiromichi Ishikawa who told that Japan is aiming to get free of Aujeszky's Disease by 2012.

    The six member states all presented a clear and updated report about the pig health status in their country. Some had a positive story to tell, like Dr Hiromichi Ishikawa who told that Japan is aiming to get free of Aujeszky's Disease by 2012.

  • Of course the current story for South Korea is less positive and Dr Jung Sung-Dae informed that of the countries 9.9 million pigs already one third had to be culled.

    Of course the current story for South Korea is less positive and Dr Jung Sung-Dae informed that of the countries 9.9 million pigs already one third had to be culled.

  • Dr Sacha Seneque, Merial Australia, then informed the delegates in an excellent keynote lecture about epidemiology of FMD and how international cooperation can possibly prevent large-scale FMD outbreaks.

    Dr Sacha Seneque, Merial Australia, then informed the delegates in an excellent keynote lecture about epidemiology of FMD and how international cooperation can possibly prevent large-scale FMD outbreaks.

  • One of the highlights in the parallel sessions contained a broad analysis into the highly pathogenic PRRS outbreaks in Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos in 2010. Dr Nguyen Tung explained that in relation to HP-PRRS, two virus strains can be distinguished: one that occurred in 2007 and one from 2010.

    One of the highlights in the parallel sessions contained a broad analysis into the highly pathogenic PRRS outbreaks in Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos in 2010. Dr Nguyen Tung explained that in relation to HP-PRRS, two virus strains can be distinguished: one that occurred in 2007 and one from 2010.

  • In Southern Vietnam and Cambodia, therefore both the 2007 and the 2010 strain can be found nowadays. In Northern Vietnam and Laos, however, ONLY the 2010 strain can be found, suggesting the 2007 strain has been wiped out. An explanation has yet to be found.

    In Southern Vietnam and Cambodia, therefore both the 2007 and the 2010 strain can be found nowadays. In Northern Vietnam and Laos, however, ONLY the 2010 strain can be found, suggesting the 2007 strain has been wiped out. An explanation has yet to be found.

  • Several sponsors held satellite symposia. Both Intervet/Schering-Plough as Boehringer Ingelheim (picture) zoomed in on the efficacy of their respiratory vaccines.

    Several sponsors held satellite symposia. Both Intervet/Schering-Plough as Boehringer Ingelheim (picture) zoomed in on the efficacy of their respiratory vaccines.

  • Apart from well-known pharmaceutical sponsors, the 'local' Thai agricultural businesses were present, like Charoen Pokphand...

    Apart from well-known pharmaceutical sponsors, the 'local' Thai agricultural businesses were present, like Charoen Pokphand...

  • ...and Betagro.

    ...and Betagro.

  • The second day of the congress included an interesting presentation about HP-PRRS by expert Prof Dr Roongroje Thanawongnuwech. He spoke about the only case that occurred in Thailand.

    The second day of the congress included an interesting presentation about HP-PRRS by expert Prof Dr Roongroje Thanawongnuwech. He spoke about the only case that occurred in Thailand.

  • David J. Hampson, Murdoch University, Australia, spoke about the 'treasure trove' of genomic sequencing when it comes down to unraveling mysteries around diseases. His research involves Brachispyra bacteria at gene level.

    David J. Hampson, Murdoch University, Australia, spoke about the 'treasure trove' of genomic sequencing when it comes down to unraveling mysteries around diseases. His research involves Brachispyra bacteria at gene level.

  • Several satellite symposia closed the day. The Pfizer Animal Health symposium answere questions related to how to stamp out and avoid occurrence of e.g. Classical Swine Fever through good prevention and biosecurity.

    Several satellite symposia closed the day. The Pfizer Animal Health symposium answere questions related to how to stamp out and avoid occurrence of e.g. Classical Swine Fever through good prevention and biosecurity.

Or register to be able to comment.