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PROBIOTICS IN PIGS: France

With the use of antibiotics becoming increasingly unpopular in certain parts of Europe, the search for alternatives is gaining ground. Hence, quite a number of veterinarians made their appearance at the third technical meeting on the yeast Saccharomyces boulardii, manufactured and marketed as Levucell SB by Lallemand Animal Nutrition. Vincent ter Beek, Pig Progress, joined in as well.

Photo

  • Paris, France, was the stage for the third edition of the technical meeting on the yeast Saccharomyces boulardii, organised by Canadian animal nutrition company Lallemand.

    Paris, France, was the stage for the third edition of the technical meeting on the yeast Saccharomyces boulardii, organised by Canadian animal nutrition company Lallemand.

  • About 125 international industry specialists travelled from all over the world to hear six experts speak about research progress made in this specific field of probiotics. Three topics were addressed: colostrum; peripartum stress and diarrhoea in piglets.

    About 125 international industry specialists travelled from all over the world to hear six experts speak about research progress made in this specific field of probiotics. Three topics were addressed: colostrum; peripartum stress and diarrhoea in piglets.

  • Dr Henri Salmon, attached to the French national agricultural research institute INRA, in Tours, summarised the scientific background of the essence and importance of colostrum and its function in relation to immunity transfer from sow to piglets.

    Dr Henri Salmon, attached to the French national agricultural research institute INRA, in Tours, summarised the scientific background of the essence and importance of colostrum and its function in relation to immunity transfer from sow to piglets.

  • Dr Jean Le Dividich, who was also attached to INRA and who was introduced as the 'pope' when it comes down to colostrum research, spoke about energy content in colostrum, and how the addition of S.boulardii can have a positive influence on this.

    Dr Jean Le Dividich, who was also attached to INRA and who was introduced as the 'pope' when it comes down to colostrum research, spoke about energy content in colostrum, and how the addition of S.boulardii can have a positive influence on this.

  • Interestingly, he mentioned recent research which suggests that the birth order does not make a difference for total colostrum intake by piglets. In other words, whether they are born first or last seems unimportant for total colostrum intake.

    Interestingly, he mentioned recent research which suggests that the birth order does not make a difference for total colostrum intake by piglets. In other words, whether they are born first or last seems unimportant for total colostrum intake.

  • Dr Nuria Canibe, Aarhus University, then explained about experiments with fistulated sows, in which feed energy content was registered before and after entering the colon in sows, in order to find out if adding S.boulardii did influence energy uptake. She concluded no negative effects could be noted in the hindgut.

    Dr Nuria Canibe, Aarhus University, then explained about experiments with fistulated sows, in which feed energy content was registered before and after entering the colon in sows, in order to find out if adding S.boulardii did influence energy uptake. She concluded no negative effects could be noted in the hindgut.

  • David Guillou, Lallemand Animal Nutrition, summarised various trials into the use of S.boulardii in sows and said that sow microbial flora are sensitive to the diet fed, which both includes the fibre source and the addition of the yeast.

    David Guillou, Lallemand Animal Nutrition, summarised various trials into the use of S.boulardii in sows and said that sow microbial flora are sensitive to the diet fed, which both includes the fibre source and the addition of the yeast.

  • Dr Ken Mellits, Nottingham University, UK, then drew a comparison between Antibiotic Associated Disease (AAD) in humans, often occurring in immunocompromised hospital patients and neonatal piglets. Both are susceptible for Clostridium difficile.

    Dr Ken Mellits, Nottingham University, UK, then drew a comparison between Antibiotic Associated Disease (AAD) in humans, often occurring in immunocompromised hospital patients and neonatal piglets. Both are susceptible for Clostridium difficile.

  • Some of his research, using deep sequencing technique, indicated that the use of antibiotics like colistin and tiamulin, have an influence on all bacteria present in a piglet's gut. Not only clostridia, but also lactobacilli percentages went down (6% to 2%).

    Some of his research, using deep sequencing technique, indicated that the use of antibiotics like colistin and tiamulin, have an influence on all bacteria present in a piglet's gut. Not only clostridia, but also lactobacilli percentages went down (6% to 2%).

  • PhD student Helen Davies, Nottingham University, UK, then reported on data on pig health after probiotic supplementation with S.boulardii. She noted that the piglets fed probiotics had fewer long-term Salmonella infections and also that pigs had a more uniform slaughterweight.

    PhD student Helen Davies, Nottingham University, UK, then reported on data on pig health after probiotic supplementation with S.boulardii. She noted that the piglets fed probiotics had fewer long-term Salmonella infections and also that pigs had a more uniform slaughterweight.

  • Dr Yannig Le Treut wrapped up the technical meeting and said that there is still a lot to discover, but the credibility and the potential for probiotics are definitely there.

    Dr Yannig Le Treut wrapped up the technical meeting and said that there is still a lot to discover, but the credibility and the potential for probiotics are definitely there.

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